Google Tokyo Pendants | 2018-2019 - Iontank
['Software', 'Design', 'Electronics', 'Fabrication'] - Description

Finished Sculpture, Courtesy of Iontank.
Finished Sculpture, Courtesy of Iontank.


Finished Sculpture, Courtesy of Iontank.
Finished Sculpture, Courtesy of Iontank.


Finished Sculpture, Courtesy of Iontank.
Finished Sculpture, Courtesy of Iontank.


Primary lighting board, which forms the core of the pendant, Courtesy of Iontank.
Primary lighting board, which forms the core of the pendant, Courtesy of Iontank.


Custom test bed for the lighting boards, Courtesy of Iontank.
Custom test bed for the lighting boards, Courtesy of Iontank.


Lighting boards assembled into "Pendant Hats", Courtesy of Iontank.
Lighting boards assembled into "Pendant Hats", Courtesy of Iontank.


LED Board soldering jigs, Courtesy of Iontank.
LED Board soldering jigs, Courtesy of Iontank.


Test hat and board assembly, Courtesy of Iontank.
Test hat and board assembly, Courtesy of Iontank.


RGB LED testing in Pittsburgh, Courtesy of Iontank.
RGB LED testing in Pittsburgh, Courtesy of Iontank.


Animation testing, Courtesy of Iontank.
Animation testing, Courtesy of Iontank.


Animation testing, Courtesy of Iontank.
Animation testing, Courtesy of Iontank.


Finished Sculpture, Courtesy of Iontank.
Finished Sculpture, Courtesy of Iontank.


Description | Official Site: Google Tokyo Pendants by Iontank
The pendants were a complicated 3D lighting PCB design. They combined multiple board designs connected at different angles and hung off one cable. They use two different types of LED, a built in LED driver, boost regulator, and AVR Microcontroller to provide full animation and color temperature control over I2C. They were driven by a collection of Beaglebone Black’s running custom software which used the hardware I2C interfaces to translate websocket messages to I2C commands. They were installed in a constellation of over 100 with lengths of 16, 24, and 36 inches.

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